Covid-19: a bill twice as expensive as expected for Social Security in 2021


The health crisis will have cost the world dearly, and especially the States. The calculations remain partial and complicated, and they are mainly estimates, but we know their content: tens and tens of billions of euros. The bill continues to climb, as announced by Franck von Lennep, the director of Social Security.

Nearly 10 billion euros in spending in 2021?

If the government is now used to taking out the checkbook, the announcement should hardly please: on May 26, 2021, during a hearing before the deputies of the Social Affairs Committee, Franck von Lennep has suggested that the government has completely screwed up. His forecast of the cost of Covid-19 in 2021 would be far from the account.

As he explains, in Budget 2021, the Covid had a cost linked to the idea ” that there is no new wave “. However, this was far from being the case, with in particular the third general confinement of the population in April 2021. Obviously, the bill has exploded.

It even doubled compared to estimates: expected at 4.3 billion euros, a sum included in the 2021 Budget, the Covid-19 should cost between 9 and 10 billion to Social Security in 2021. And again, Frankc von Lennep specifies that “ many uncertainties about what the additional costs related to the crisis will be in the second half of the year “.

What cost of the crisis for France?

An even higher bill, this will increase the total cost of the health crisis for France. An already very high bill: 160 billion euros for the year 2020 alone, marked by the two generalized confinements and massive aid to companies and employees.

This trend towards the infusion of the economy by the state coffers will stop : aid will be gradually reduced during the summer and will mostly disappear in the fourth quarter of 2021. But the bill announced will continue to increase.

Olivier Dussopt, Minister of Public Accounts, announced in early April 2021 a cost of 424 billion euros for the State between 2020 and 2022, or over three years. But nothing is certain …