More than 100 former world leaders urge G7 to spend money on COVID-19 vaccines for poor countries


More than 100 former world leaders urge G7 to spend money on COVID-19 vaccines for poor countries

230 powerful figures, including more than 100 former Prime Ministers, Presidents and Foreign Ministers, jointly signed an open letter calling on G7 countries to pay more than 60% of the cost needed to vaccinate against Covid-19 for poor countries.

Two former British Prime Ministers Gordon Brown (left) and Tony Blair signed a letter to the G7 group. Photo: PA

According to the Guardian, former world leaders and many influential figures insist that the world will only be safe from COVID-19 when everyone in every region of the world is safe. 2020 has seen the failure of global cooperation in pandemic prevention, but 2021 may usher in a new era. To do that, the Group of 7 industrialized countries (G-7) needs to contribute about $44 billion of the $66 billion needed to vaccinate everyone globally.

“The fact that the G7 and G20 help low- and middle-income countries access vaccines is not an act of charity, but an act of strategic interest to all countries. As the World Monetary Fund (IMF) asserts, this is ‘the best public investment in history'”, the signing group stated in the letter.

The letter was sent ahead of the G7 summit taking place in Cornwall, England from 11-13 July. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to make a similar call to urge the G7 to finance global vaccination campaigns. “Completing the world’s vaccinations this year will be the greatest achievement in the history of health care,” Johnson said in a statement on June 6.

Among the co-signers of the open letter were former United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former British Prime Ministers Gordon Brown and Tony Blair and 15 former leaders of African countries.