Mr. Fumio Kishida was elected Chairman of the ruling LPD Party, paving the way to become Prime Minister of Japan


Mr. Fumio Kishida was elected Chairman of the ruling LPD Party, paving the way to become Prime Minister of Japan

On September 29, former Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida was elected chairman of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), thereby paving the way to become the country’s next prime minister.

Former Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida after being elected as the new chairman of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), in Tokyo September 29, 2021. Photo: AFP/VNA

According to Kyodo News, Mr. Fumio Kishida won over his direct competitor, Public Administration Reform Minister Taro Kono in the second round of voting to elect the LDP chairman.

In the second round of voting, Mr. Kishida received 257 out of 427 valid votes, of which 249 were from MPs and 8 from provincial party committees. For his part, candidate Kono received only 170 votes, including 131 votes from parliamentarians and 39 votes from the provincial party committee.

Earlier on the same day, the ruling LDP party in Japan held a vote to elect a new chairman to replace outgoing Prime Minister Suga Yoshihide. Voting results showed that no candidate won the majority of votes in the first round, the two candidates with the most votes, Kishida and Kono, had to enter the knockout round.

Among the 4 candidates running for the LDP Chair this year, Public Administration Reform Minister Taro Kono received a total of 255 votes out of 762 valid votes, including 86 votes from MPs. and 169 votes of grassroots party members; former Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida received a total of 256 votes, including 146 votes from parliamentarians and 110 votes from grassroots party members; former Minister of Internal Affairs and Communications Sanae Takaichi received 114 votes from MPs and 74 votes from grassroots party members; and acting LDP Executive Secretary Seiko Noda received 34 votes from parliamentarians and 29 votes from grassroots party members.

With this result, the LDP will have to continue to hold a second round of voting to choose a new leader from the two candidates with the highest number of votes in the first round, Taro Kono and Fumio Kishida. According to LDP regulations, the audience to vote in the second round is narrower than in the first round when only 382 parliamentarians and 47 representatives of provincial party ministries are allowed to vote.

After the results of the election of LDP Chairman, the National Assembly of Japan is scheduled to hold an extraordinary session on October 4 to officially vote to elect the new LDP President Kishida as Prime Minister to replace Mr. Suga Yoshihide, who decided decided to step down after just one year in power because of a drop in approval ratings related to the policy to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic.

New LDP President Kishida – 64 years old and will hold the post until the end of September 2024 – will almost certainly become Japan’s 100th prime minister because the ruling coalition currently holds a majority of seats in the lower house. institute.

If elected by the Japanese House of Representatives as Prime Minister to succeed Mr. Suga, Mr. Kishida as LDP President and new Prime Minister will face a dense agenda.

According to the Washington Post, Mr. Kishida will have to immediately embark on the fight to respond to COVID-19 and rebuild the economy, which has been heavily affected by the pandemic. The new leader of the LDP must also prepare soon for the general election this fall, which the LDP is expected to win.

In addition, public opinion will wait to see how Mr. Kishida realizes his policy commitments, including reducing the income gap of workers, redistributing social benefits and strengthening social welfare. market-oriented economic policy, which was the main policy of former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s economic policy.

On the foreign front, it is likely that there will be no major changes. As the longtime leader of the LDP, Mr. Kishida is expected to continue Japan’s foreign policy path as under Prime Ministers Abe and Suga, with a focus on emphasizing the Japan-US alliance and commitment. for a free and open Indo-Pacific region, while strengthening partnerships with members of the Diamond Quartet.